Locksmith Question Are Decorative Locks the Best Way to Keep Your Home Secure?

Locksmith Question Are Decorative Locks the Best Way to Keep Your Home Secure?Much has been written online about boosting your home’s curb appeal by enhancing the entrance. However, if you are picking out a new door with a fresh lock, don’t think decor only, because the last thing you want to do is make yourself vulnerable for a break in or burglary.

See More:

http://www.noordinaryhomestead.com/are-decorative-locks-the-best-way-to-keep-your-home-secure/

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A Tampa Locksmith’s Secret Tips for Teen to Remember Their Keys

“Um…so…I kind of lost my keys. Can you come home and let me in?”

If you’re anything like me, you’ll have to quell an irate growl, or at least temper it into a grudging sigh. Yes, your latch key child lost his keys.

Again.

And you’ll have to put aside that overdue project you’re working on and tell your boss that you need to skip the important meeting at three o’clock with that new client, because your son forgot his keys, and he’s standing out in the cold.

Again.

We’ve all been there, and many of us have tried it every trick in the book: friendly reminders, sticky notes on the door, and giving them a brightly-colored keychain so they can find it in their “disaster area” of a room when they lose it.

How can you get your forgetful teen or tween child to remember to bring his or her keys to school-and bring them home, too?

Here are several ideas that you might try:

Put one of those spring-loaded clips onto her keychain and clip the keys to the strap of your child’s purse or backpack every night. A safer option might be to see if there’s already a clip inside a backpack pocket intended to attach keychains to, or if there might be some kind of loop inside a pocket where you can clip the keys. That way it’s always with your child, but can’t be snagged easily by a prankster classmate.

 A carabiner would also work as well, in place of a spring-loaded clip, and it may be more durable. You can find very sturdy carabiners at stores that sell hunting, hiking, camping, or rock climbing gear.

Even better would be one of those retractable keychains that allow you to clip keys to a belt loop (or a loop on your child’s purse or backpack), then pull on the keys to extend the cord while your child unlocks the door. When she’s done, the cord will retract, and the keys will stay put, right where they belong.

A lanyard may be another option. You could loop it over your child’s jacket on the hook where it hangs, or lay it on top of something that your child never forgets, like her glasses or smartphone. Have your child wear it around his neck to and from school. Unfortunately, this tip relies on your child remembering to hang it over his coat (so he will notice it when he gets his coat to come home). This method also requires that your child remembers his coat!

You could also attach the key ring to your child’s wallet. Kids tend to keep track of the money they want to spend more than they do their keys! Plus, a wallet is bigger and more noticeable in your child’s hand, so it’s less likely to get set down and left behind, especially with jingly keys dangling from it.

A hidden back up key is another option. You can hide the key in a fake rock or under a planter (or preferably in a more creative place). The downside to this tip is that if someone sees your child hiding/retrieving the key, it’s not only obvious that your child is at home alone, but that there’s an easily available way to get inside.

A safer option would be giving keys to a friendly neighbor. It would need to be a neighbor that tends to be home a lot, or at least when your child arrives home from school. But this should only be a back up solution, because even the kindly old lady who “never” goes out can have an emergency, and be away from home when that key is needed most. It also requires a high level of trust in that neighbor, that they’ll not only respect your privacy and not trespass in your home while you’re away, but that they won’t leave your key laying around where their delinquent nephew can grab it.

You might consider sewing an emergency key between the lining and the exterior of your kid’s backpack or purse, and not let her know until that one awful time when you just can’t come to her rescue, and neither can anyone else. Then she can rip open the sewn-up seam in the lining and tear the key free, if necessary.

If you live close to libraries, coffee shops, or other safe places to hang out, it may be smart to have a “back up to the back up plan,” a place where your child can spend time as a last resort if there’s no way to get into the house.

The ideal solution, though more expensive, is to get one of those deadbolt locks that can take either a key or a code punched in. They tend to cost around $100 for one lockset, and they are battery operated. You can have multiple unique codes programmed into the lock, one for each member of the family, and one for the nanny or the dog walker. You can save one for the plumber to get in, then change it after his job is done.  America’s Lock and Key, a local locksmith in the Tampa, Florida area, is an expert in installing these kinds of locks.

Many parents say this solution is well worth the extra expense, and just think-you won’t need to pay for more replacement keys! Just be sure that your child understands that they can’t share their code with anyone, or let their friends see them enter the code.

If you’re concerned about that, you could also look into locks that require a fingerprint scan to open, rather than a code. You won’t be able to use this with your plumber, but you’ll have the peace of mind of knowing your child can always get in, no matter what, and that no one outside the family can. And if that expensive lock gives you pause, just imagine how much you’ll save if you don’t have to leave work every time your child is locked out on a cold day.

If all else fails, and you’re really exasperated when your child forgets his keys again, you could always tie the keys to a big, clunky, stinky shoe and make your child carry it around in his backpack for a week. You’ll get dirty looks from him all week long, but he might be less likely to forget his keys the next time!

Originally Posted On:

http://mombloggersclub.com/profiles/blogs/a-tampa-locksmith-s-secret-tips-on-how-to-get-your-tw-een-to-reme

How to Get Your Teen to Remember Their Keys Tampa FL Locksmith’s Secret Tips On

There’s nothing worse than being in the middle of a hectic workday and getting an “urgent” call for your teen or tween child that starts like this:

“Um…so…I kind of lost my keys. Can you come home and let me in?”

If you’re anything like me, you’ll have to quell an irate growl, or at least temper it into a grudging sigh. Yes, your latch key child lost his keys.

Again.

And you’ll have to put aside that overdue project you’re working on and tell your boss that you need to skip the important meeting at three o’clock with that new client, because your son forgot his keys, and he’s standing out in the cold.

Again.

We’ve all been there, and many of us have tried it every trick in the book: friendly reminders, sticky notes on the door, and giving them a brightly-colored keychain so they can find it in their “disaster area” of a room when they lose it.

How can you get your forgetful teen or tween child to remember to bring his or her keys to school-and bring them home, too?

Here are several ideas that you might try:

Put one of those spring-loaded clips onto her keychain and clip the keys to the strap of your child’s purse or backpack every night. A safer option might be to see if there’s already a clip inside a backpack pocket intended to attach keychains to, or if there might be some kind of loop inside a pocket where you can clip the keys. That way it’s always with your child, but can’t be snagged easily by a prankster classmate.

 A carabiner would also work as well, in place of a spring-loaded clip, and it may be more durable. You can find very sturdy carabiners at stores that sell hunting, hiking, camping, or rock climbing gear.

Even better would be one of those retractable keychains that allow you to clip keys to a belt loop (or a loop on your child’s purse or backpack), then pull on the keys to extend the cord while your child unlocks the door. When she’s done, the cord will retract, and the keys will stay put, right where they belong.

A lanyard may be another option. You could loop it over your child’s jacket on the hook where it hangs, or lay it on top of something that your child never forgets, like her glasses or smartphone. Have your child wear it around his neck to and from school. Unfortunately, this tip relies on your child remembering to hang it over his coat (so he will notice it when he gets his coat to come home). This method also requires that your child remembers his coat!

You could also attach the key ring to your child’s wallet. Kids tend to keep track of the money they want to spend more than they do their keys! Plus, a wallet is bigger and more noticeable in your child’s hand, so it’s less likely to get set down and left behind, especially with jingly keys dangling from it.

A hidden back up key is another option. You can hide the key in a fake rock or under a planter (or preferably in a more creative place). The downside to this tip is that if someone sees your child hiding/retrieving the key, it’s not only obvious that your child is at home alone, but that there’s an easily available way to get inside.

A safer option would be giving keys to a friendly neighbor. It would need to be a neighbor that tends to be home a lot, or at least when your child arrives home from school. But this should only be a back up solution, because even the kindly old lady who “never” goes out can have an emergency, and be away from home when that key is needed most. It also requires a high level of trust in that neighbor, that they’ll not only respect your privacy and not trespass in your home while you’re away, but that they won’t leave your key laying around where their delinquent nephew can grab it.

You might consider sewing an emergency key between the lining and the exterior of your kid’s backpack or purse, and not let her know until that one awful time when you just can’t come to her rescue, and neither can anyone else. Then she can rip open the sewn-up seam in the lining and tear the key free, if necessary.

If you live close to libraries, coffee shops, or other safe places to hang out, it may be smart to have a “back up to the back up plan,” a place where your child can spend time as a last resort if there’s no way to get into the house.

The ideal solution, though more expensive, is to get one of those deadbolt locks that can take either a key or a code punched in. They tend to cost around $100 for one lockset, and they are battery operated. You can have multiple unique codes programmed into the lock, one for each member of the family, and one for the nanny or the dog walker. You can save one for the plumber to get in, then change it after his job is done.  America’s Lock and Key, a local locksmith in the Tampa, Florida area, is an expert in installing these kinds of locks.

Many parents say this solution is well worth the extra expense, and just think-you won’t need to pay for more replacement keys! Just be sure that your child understands that they can’t share their code with anyone, or let their friends see them enter the code.

If you’re concerned about that, you could also look into locks that require a fingerprint scan to open, rather than a code. You won’t be able to use this with your plumber, but you’ll have the peace of mind of knowing your child can always get in, no matter what, and that no one outside the family can. And if that expensive lock gives you pause, just imagine how much you’ll save if you don’t have to leave work every time your child is locked out on a cold day.

If all else fails, and you’re really exasperated when your child forgets his keys again, you could always tie the keys to a big, clunky, stinky shoe and make your child carry it around in his backpack for a week. You’ll get dirty looks from him all week long, but he might be less likely to forget his keys the next time!

Originally Posted on

http://mombloggersclub.com/profiles/blogs/a-tampa-locksmith-s-secret-tips-on-how-to-get-your-teen-to-reme

Prevent Locking Your Kids In The Car

Prevent Locking Your Kids In The Car

  1. Make sure to take your kids with you. As in, remove them from the vehicle when you go make a quick stop at the supermarket. In some states, like Florida (where the temperatures are generally high) this is mandatory by law. By getting in to the habit of taking your child with you, you’ll remember to take your child out of the car even on your busiest days.
  2. Never leave your keys within arms reach of your child. Even when you’re at home. The auto lock on your key fob makes it possible for a child to lock themselves in a car. Always carry spare keys with you and don’t keep your spare on the same key ring as your main key set. America’s Lock and Key (located in Tampa, FL) or your local locksmith can make a duplicate of most keys for less than what a dealer would charge.
  3. Ask your child(ren)’s caregiver to give you a call if your child is absent for the day. Sometimes parents head to work and forget that their child is in the car. This is the most dangerous type of lock-in. Being in a hot car for a full workday can be life threatening.
  4. Always check the car seat each time you leave your car. Some people leave an important item like their phone or wallet on the floor in front of or next to the car seat, so they must look at the car seat each time they leave the car. Other people place a sign on the dashboard. Never assume that you won’t forget.
  5. Have your local locksmith number programmed in your phone.

Read More:

https://saferide4kids.com/blog/locking-kids-in-car/

Tampa Bay Blogger – Expert Locksmith Advice: How to Manage Home Security

Losing your house keys can be extremely frustrating, but it doesn’t have to be such a trial or tribulation. Today, thanks to new technology, key copying can be carried out by way of a special app on your smartphone!

  key-americas-lock-and-key

Several smartphone apps are available to download, allowing you to make a copy of a key simply by taking a photo on your cell phone camera. This is the perfect solution for lock-outs or misplaced keys.

However, a professional local locksmith in Tampa, Florida, Efi Amoyal of America’s Lock and Key, takes issue with this new technology. Amoyal says that these apps compromise home security because they don’t establish the identity of the owner of the key before a copy is made. A random person can take a quick picture of your home key, make a copy, and could possibly burglarize your home.

Using such an app is so easy though! Take a picture of your key, send it off through the app and pay the cost of the service (less than $10!) and make your order. After a couple of days your new key will arrive at the address you requested.

americas-lock-and-key

Clearly there is a margin of error with this method. The key must be decoded, placed on a machine and then manually cut. In a perfect environment, the key will be tested on the lock during the process and then adjusted accordingly. As this is not possible with the app, the client should not expect a 100% success rate.

If you do use these new apps, extra security is highly recommended by locksmiths. New technological advancements are made every day to make your home security easier to manage.

Take for example the alarm system. Today it no longer requires the house being wired – A home security system is nothing more than sensors that detect what’s going on in and around your home, plus equipment connected to those sensors that lets you monitor them. The main sensors, of course, are motion detectors, cameras and microphones. Everything can be managed from your phone, and any unusual activity is logged and your phone will notify you.

apps-americas-lock-and-key

Because security equipment is now cheaper than it ever was and smartphone technology is so advanced and available, home security has become more affordable. So if you don’t end up using that newfangled app for copying keys, you may end up using another app to manage your home security.

For more information on lock and key services and other professional licensed locksmith solutions, visit America’s Lock and Key.

Have you ever used an app to produce a copy of your house key?  What apps do you use to monitor and secure your home?

Originally Posted

http://tampabaybloggers.org/locksmith-advice-how-to-manage-home-security-on-your-mobile-phone/

 

Installing Decorative Front Door Lock

My family and I downsized into a fixer upper last summer, a small 1940s cottage. Slowly but surely, one project at a time, we have been making it home. The charm and character of our house is one of my favorite things about our new purchase. Unfortunately, the charm factor was knocked down in a major way due to the unsightly security doors that came with the house.

For almost a year, instead of them making me feel safe, they made me feel as if I was in prison, I hated them. From the moment that we moved in, I have been planning their demise. Though the door that house was originally built with was the most energy efficient, I was looking for something that would allow more natural light to enter our home. After spending some time browsing online options, I finally found the opportunity last month to purchase a craftsman-style door. I also bought new decorative, but secure exterior door locks.

When the door finally came, it felt like Christmas had come early. Our local hardware store had removed our old door and installed our new door in only a couple of hours, and I couldn’t wait to finally make it functional. I called my local locksmith in Tampa, Efi Amoyal of America’s Lock and Key, who happens to be an expert in installing decorative front door locks. I’m so in love with my new doors.

See below for more tips from Efi of America’s Lock and Key about what to do when you find yourself locked out of your car or home.

How to Keep your Guns Safe

How to Keep your Guns SafeToday gun ownership is a basic American right. Some 300 million firearms are owned by private American citizens in the US‐ i.e. around one gun for every man, woman and child in America, or nearly one third of the US population owns on gun or more. Many of these firearms were bought with home protection in mind, in the event of an unwanted intruder. However, as guns are dangerous objects, they should be treated with respect and caution. If you have a family at home and are concerned about the gun getting into the wrong hands, you aren’t alone..

Read More 

http://www.homedefensegun.net/keep-guns-safe/

Safe place to keep guns

https://www.nrafamily.org/articles/2016/4/14/6-ways-to-safely-store-your-firearms/